Browse Category: GT 380 Crankcase

Lock pin repair

After months of doing nothing on the GT380 I’m now back on track. This fall has been very busy and I had to focus all on work and not much spare time to invest on my GT380. Hopefully it will be better the following winter and spring.

Two weeks of Christmas vacation has been good and I was able to get some steps further on the project, but then…..I spotted a disaster.

 

Two of the lock pins holding the bearings at the gear shaft in place were squeezed all the way down into the crankcase. I should have spotted this at a previous stage, but what now. Is it game over. Do I have to get a new case ? Cracks on the other sides as well due to the brutal force into the aluminum.

Previous owner must have done this without thinking properly before assembling the engine. And on both gear axles…This is what happens when you rush into unknown stuff without taking the time needed to think twice and think it through.

I have a spare engine I can use,  but consider all the work I had put into this it’s worth giving it a try to fix this one. And if it works I will still have two GT380 engines.  This is how i did it :

Step 1:

Drilled and milled holes at the rear side and was able to push the pins out.

Step 2:

Drilled 2,5mm hole from the top side. Threaded 3mm and inserted a set screw and adjusted to the correct depth.

Step 3:

Gluing using Speedy-Fix

If something is too good to be true, .. it’s not true. That was also what I thought about Speedy-Fix, cost nothing from E-bay. Can it work ? Yes, I have tested it extensively on plastic, wood and metal. It really works. A totally damage plastic side cover was saved using this powder and hardener.

I could have TIG welded a tap onto the pin and pulled it out, but I don’t have any welding tools. Since the aluminium already had cracks I don’t think it added much structural damages to do the drilling and milling. A lot of materials left and if the gluing fails the set screw will still be in place.

 

 

 

GT 380 Crankcase and cylinders

Cleaning :

All parts were laid in a bath of pure paraffin overnight to loosen up the old burned materials.

Thereafter, cleaning with a brush and flushed with water.

 

Powder blasting:

The powder blasting came out pretty well, but it’s messy, powder all over the place, everywhere. Inside my body as well… The biggest benefit is clear, no dangerous particles to damage the engine. It’s baking soda and can be flushed away. The moste resistant parts are hard to get off with only powder blasting and the finish of the alu parts get’s not that nice using powder.

Since I already have invested in a sandblasting cabinet I decided to stop the messy powder thing and loaded up the cabinet for glass blasting.

 

Glass blasting:

As always on my blog, click on the images for a more detailed view.

Much cleaner and more fun to do the glass blasting. The biggest issue will be to be to get rid of all the glass particles. Rinsing in water and blow dry with compressed air is important.

 

 

Coating with oil:

 

The parts looks shiny and nice after glass blasting but will soon start to oxidize. I was recommended to use a good penetrating oil, like Omega 636 to preserve the crankcase. Let it soak for one day before drying off.

And again, blow very well using compressed air to get rid of all remains from the blasting media.

So much more fun to start the assembling of the engine when all the parts are cleaned and shiny.  🙂  🙂